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Table of Contents
Foreword
Preface
Glossary

Chapter 4: Climate

4.8: Frozen Lakes and Snow Distribution in Early Winter in Central Manitoba

This early winter Landsat 1 image shows clearly the distribution of snow and ice over parts of central Manitoba. Wooded areas are easily picked out because of their dark tone, for example, Riding Mountain 1, Duck Mountain 2, and the Porcupine Hills 3. In both Riding Mountain 4 and Duck Mountain 5 scars left by forest fires are obvious; woodland has only partly regenerated in these areas resulting in a lighter tone than the surrounds. By this date all the lakes are frozen and have a snow cover producing a light-toned, even-textured surface, for example, Clear Lake 6 and Whitewater Lake 7 in Riding Mountain, Dauphin Lake 8, the north end of Lake Manitoba 9, Lake Winnipegosis 10, Waterhen Lake 11, and Swan Lake 12 in the north. The Assiniboine River has been dammed at Shellmouth 13 creating Lake of the Prairies 14—light-toned and even textured. The image was obtained close to the winter solstice when the sun angle was low resulting in long shadows, especially where valleys trend east/west, for example, those of Boggy Creek 15, the Shell River 16, Birdtail Creek 17, and parts of the Assiniboine 18 Despite the fact that they are frozen and snow-covered, some river courses appear dark-toned because they are fringed by woodland, for example, Swan River 19 leading to Swan Lake and Wilson River 20 flowing to Dauphin Lake.

Figure 4.8: Frozen Lakes and Snow Distribution in Early Winter in Central Manitoba

Figure 4.8: Frozen Lakes and Snow Distribution in Early Winter in Central Manitoba

 

Figure 4.8

Landsat 1 Image band 7 (0.8-1.1 mm: infrared)

Date: December 19, 1973

Scale: 1:1,000,000 (approx.)