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Table of Contents
Foreword
Preface
Glossary

Chapter 3: Geologic Structure and Landforms

3.60: The Russell Esker Near the Caribou River in Northeastern Manitoba

The water body on the right 1 is Long Lake, part of the Caribou River system that flows into Hudson Bay about 25 miles (40 km) to the east. A prominent esker 2 can be seen trending southwestward from the shore of the lake. Its total length is about 18 miles (29 km) less than half of which is shown on the photo. It is prominent enough that is has been named the Russell Esker. In common with many other eskers in northern Manitoba, there is good hiking along the crest. At its northern end 3 there is a caribou crossing of the river as recorded by Wilson and Ackroyd. “At Long Lake we camped at a busy caribou crossing and watched for two days while small groups swam the narrows of the lake.”[i] Another small patch of esker-like deposits occurs west of the main esker 4.

This area is in the shrub zone of the forest/tundra transition vegetation zone[ii] in which a “shrub tundra like community predominates.”[iii] On the photograph the shrub areas 5 are slightly darker-toned than the surrounding areas.

Figure 3.60: The Russell Esker Near the Caribou River in Northeastern Manitoba

Figure 3.60: The Russell Esker Near the Caribou River in Northeastern Manitoba

Figure 3.60

Vertical air photo: A14678-106

Flight height: 30,000 feet a.s.l.; lens focal length: 152.7 mm

Date: July 2, 1955

Scale: 1:59,000 (approx.)

Location of centre point: 59° 26'N, 95° 31'W

Map sheets: 1:250,000 54 M Caribou River

1:50,000 54 M/5 Gross Lake

Notes

[i] Wilson and Aykroyd, op. cit. n.d., 138.

[ii] Scott, op. cit., 1996, figure 4.2, 45.

[iii] Scott, op. cit., 1996, 53.