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Table of Contents
Foreword
Preface
Glossary

Chapter 3: Geologic Structure and Landforms

3.105: Spits at Gull Bay, South of Long Point, West Side of Lake Winnipeg

The image shows two spits growing across Gull Bay 1, logically named North Bar 2 and South Bar 3. There is also a spit-like feature 4 growing southward from the south end of South Bar entrapping a lagoon 5 behind it. The general drift of sediment seems to be from north to south that would explain North Bar and the spit south of South Bar. Sediment is probably derived by erosion of Long Point—an end moraine—the western end of which is visible on the image 6. South Bar is created by a secondary anticlockwise swirl within Gull Bay resulting in northward growth of the spit. Two small streams, North Twin Creek 7 and South Twin Creek 8, are deflected southward by sediment deposited across their mouths 9. Sedimentation behind North Bar results in a different colour 10; in the future marsh will grow in this area. Inland, strandlines indicating higher lake levels can be seen 11. These are followed by a road 12 connecting the shore with PTH 6 13 that leads north to Grand Rapids and south to Fairford. Paralleling the southern part of the highway are wide, cleared areas 14 that are the route followed by power lines south to Winnipeg from the hydro power station at Grand Rapids.

Figure 3.105: Spits at Gull Bay, South of Long Point, West Side of Lake Winnipeg

Figure 3.105: Spits at Gull Bay, South of Long Point, West Side of Lake Winnipeg

Figure 3.105

Image from Google Earth 2005: Image 2006 Terra Metrics

Scale: 1:126,000 (approx.)

Location: Townships 44, 45, 46; Ranges 10 and 11WI

Map sheets: 1:250,000 63B Waterhen Lake