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Table of Contents
Foreword
Preface
Glossary

Chapter 2: Location, Borders, and Lakes

2.9: Part of the Red River Plain and the Canada/U.S.A. Border

Culturally, the distinctive pattern of the DLS system (in Canada) is obvious. In the U.S.A. a very similar system (on which the DLS was based) is used on almost identical land. In Canada are numerous Mennonite villages of the western reserve: Neuhorst 4, Rosengart 5, Reinland 6, Schoenwiese 7, Kronsthal 8, Rosetown 9, Blumenfeld 10, Hochfeld 11, Neuenberg 12, Grandenthal 13, and Friedensruh 14. PTH 32 15 in Canada crosses the area from north to south with a slight kink 16 at the border, because the American section lines do not coincide exactly with those in Canada. In the north, the faint light-toned line that crosses the area from west-northwest to east-southeast 17 is a buried oil pipeline.

Land south of the border shows as a darker tone, but what does this represent? There must have been some variation in land use north and south of the border when the photos were taken. More light-toned fields 1—probably harvested cereal crops—can be seen in Canada and more east/west field shelterbelts of trees 2 can be seen in the U.S.A., but neither fact fully explains the tonal difference. This is a very flat region, part of the area covered by Lake Agassiz in immediate post-glacial times. Poorly developed strandlines can be seen in the south 3.

Figure 2.9: Part of the Red River Plain and the Canada/U.S.A. Border

Figure 2.9: Part of the Red River Plain and the Canada/U.S.A. Border

Figure 2.9

Vertical air photograph: A21821-65

Flight height: 24,000 feet a.s.l.; lens focal length, 85.55 mm

Date: August 10, 1970

Scale 1: 84,500 (approx.)

Location: Township 1 and 2, Ranges 2, 3 and 4WI in Canada

Map sheets 1:250,000 62H Winnipeg

1:50,000 62H/4 Altona