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Table of Contents
Foreword
Preface
Glossary

Chapter 16: Water Resources

16.20: Drainage of the Red River Plain East of Miami

Under natural conditions the Red River Plain, the floor of Glacial Lake Agassiz, was a vast expanse of marshy land, but in the early part of the 20th century it was converted into a rich agricultural area by drainage of the marshes. This was accomplished by constructing a network of artificial drainage channels and straightening some of the natural creeks. Shown here, just east of Miami, is a small eastward-flowing creek 1. Two small creeks enter it from the north 2 and east 3. The main creek has been straightened by cutting across bends and meanders 4 and confining it between well-defined banks. In mid summer when the photo was taken, it carried virtually no water—water can be seen only in the extreme east 5.

Cutting across the centre of the area is PTH 23 6 with a ditch separating it from the CN railway 7 to the north. Small bridges across the ditch 8 and level crossings over the rail line provide access to farms to the north. Also of note on this photo are irregular dark-toned lines 9 which are minor grooves that may have been gouged by icebergs in Lake Agassiz. Note also shelterbelts around farms 10 in this flat windswept area.

Figure 16.20: Drainage of the Red River Plain East of Miami

Figure 16.20: Drainage of the Red River Plain East of Miami

Figure 16.20

Vertical air photograph: A16183-90

Flight height: 10,050 feet a.s.l.; lens focal length: 152.4 mm

Scale: 1:18,600 (approx.)

Date: July 22, 1958

Location: Township 5; Range 6WI

Map sheets: 1:250,000 62G Brandon

                    1:50,000 62G/8 Miami